Is Cutting Wet Wood Bad for Chainsaw?

When you're trying to make a list of the most useful power tools, we bet it's going to be hard as hell to count chainsaws out of the list. If you've tried this machine out, then you already know it doesn't take much time to cut almost anything into pieces where most of it is wood.

But is cutting wet wood bad for chainsaw? After all, what we mostly see is using this machine on dry wood. But who said there wouldn't be a pile of rain that will get your woods all wet?

So, will it be a good idea to cut them off in this condition? Well, that's the answer we're about to put on your table today.

Cutting Wet Wood with Chainsaw – Good or Bad?

While using a power tool on something wet, the first thing that comes to our mind is if it's going to ruin the tool or not. But what hits us the next is if it doesn't, then will the performance be up to the mark?

You want it or not, but you'll think in the same way as well while working with your chainsaw on wet wood. So, is it going to be bad? Well, here's the surprising answer - it's a big fat NO!

Yup! You've heard it right. There's nothing risky or harmful about cutting wet wood with a chainsaw. Actually, what you might find more surprising is that being wet makes it easier for the chainsaw to cut the wood.

Cutting Wet Wood with Chainsaw

There can be lots of reasons for the tree getting wet. It can be raindrops, snow, or dewdrops. But as the additional moisture works as the natural lubricant, cutting the wood becomes easier than ever.

The problem with dry wood is that they are so low on required moisture that it increases friction between the wood and the chainsaw. What happens as a result is the chain speed starts slowing down during the cutting session.

But you'll see things start walking on the opposite route whenever there's a little touch of extra moisture. It eases up the cutting by lowering the level of friction as it lubricates the way.

However, if you're planning to jump on some wet wood with your chainsaw, then be ready to see stuck sawdust in your chain. This, too, can slow down your chainsaw's speed. So, you better be removing them at times.

Cutting Wet Wood with Chainsaw

By the way, don't think that just because the wood is wet, your work is always going to get easier. The level of your required effort or labor here depends on the density of the tree and its age as well.

For example, you'll have to invest an amount of labor and effort for ironwood trees, which is comparatively lower when you're cutting off any balsa wood tree. It's the moisture in the wood that changes the game there. But don't think of using anything but a micro-chisel chain when you're waiting to cut a highly dense wood.

Things to Keep in Mind While Using a Chainsaw on Wet Wood

So, have you made up your mind to cut down all those wet woods? Then before you take a step further, we'd say you keep a few things noted in your head, such as:

Using a Chainsaw on Wet Wood

Don't Be Scared of Build Up

You've already been informed that the wet wood is not going to harm the chain but will surely make the cutting easier. But that doesn't mean you won't have to deal with any build-up while pulling the task off. Yes, we're talking about the wet sawdust. Don't worry; it's nothing that can't be cleaned with a rag.

Check Out the Air Filter

The rag is going to clean up sawdust from the chain, but what about the air filter of your chainsaw's engine? Well, you don't need to take a headache about that until you're feeling any problem in running the engine. If you're noticing an issue, check out the filter if there's any debris in there or not and clean up accordingly.

Check Out the Air Filter

Keep the Slippery Conditions in Mind

When you're cutting off wet woods, then it's nothing but impossible to ignore the slippery surface. So, whenever you're climbing up there to make a cut, don't forget to add up some solid footing there, especially when it's snowing or raining. Along with that, ensure solid grip over the saw as well.

Get Protective Equipment and Clothing

There's no way to deny that cutting wood with a chainsaw is among the risky tasks. Clearly, that's the reason why you should never think about leaving the safety equipment behind, especially while cutting wet woods.

Get Protective Equipment and Clothing

So, make sure that you're taking yourself up there only when you've put on the required safety gloves and weather boots. As you'll be dealing with wet surfaces, wear clothes that are water-resistant and warm. Otherwise, the wetness might interrupt your concentration while doing the work.

Pick the Right Chain Type

If the wood surface is wet and frozen, you better pick the right kind of chain that can deal with it. We'd suggest going for a chain that has semi-chisel teeth. Thanks to their rounded teeth, which make the cuts at a little slower pace.

Pick the Right Chain Type

Don't worry about the slow speed as it doesn't mean that you'll have to stop in the middle of the work to get it sharpened again.

Be Concerned About the Frozen Debris on the Bark

The wet wood might not be a problem for the chainsaw, but we can't say the same about the frozen dirt and debris on the bark. You won't see these on the higher part of a tree but might come in touch with them on the bottom part.

Protective Gears for Cutting Wet Wood

If you haven't skipped the things we've shared above, then you probably didn't miss the part where we've told you about protective wearing. Well, it was just a fraction of what you're going to need to grab for keeping yourself safe while chopping those woods. Here's the list of gears you need in your arsenal.

Protective Gears for Cutting Wet Wood

Eye Protection

If you start thinking about the most delicate part of your body, it's hard to think of any other name first except eyes. So, you better get some protection for that in the first place. Now the question is, which one will be the perfect one as there are tons of them?

Well, we've got a few names, and among them, safety glasses come first in our mind. These glasses are made to tackle any normal dust or debris that may fly while cutting the wood.

But the reason for them being the most common choice as eye-protector is they're similar to regular sunglasses. After all, that's what makes them easy to carry. On top of that, they don't cost much as well.

Eye Protection

The next one is safety goggles, and indeed it's capable of delivering a better level of protection than the glasses. Along with saving your eyes from flying debris, it eliminates the chances of dust slipping in the eye area through the sides. But for a bit more comfort, we'd say go with the one that has air vents and better padding.

There's one more alternative you can try for protecting your eyes, and that is the face shield. If you're asking for protection not only on your eyes but the whole face, then nothing can get you that in a finer way than the face shield. But the problem is, they have the same issue as the glasses.

Hearing Protection

If you categorize power tools on the basis of their ability to make noise, then chainsaws surely will stay on the front row. The amount of noise it generates during work can easily cause hearing problems if you keep working without protection.

Hearing Protection

So, you better get something effective enough to save your ears from the noise, like earmuffs. They're the best gear we can name as they can easily handle the intense sound generated by the chainsaw. If you're thinking about putting earplugs, we don't think that's going to do any better job than earmuffs.

Chaps

Okay, indeed, it's an expensive investment, but it's totally worth it as you'll need it every time you'll pick up the chainsaw to chop down a tree or woodpile. Chaps are made to be worn over the clothes where you'll have to attach them at your waist and also around the legs.

Chaps

They are so strong that they can protect your legs even if you come in contact with your monstrous chainsaw accidentally. Don't look at the thick price tag. That's because if it's saving you from an injury, then no matter how pricey it is, it's worth the investment. After all, that's surely going to be lower than hospital bills.

Boots

The parts that need the maximum protection while cutting wood are from waist to feet. So, along with putting on chaps, you need to do something to protect your feet as well, and yes, we're talking about the boots. But if you're thinking the random boots are going to hold against a chainsaw, then you're wrong.

Never think of anything less than safety boots or steel-toe boots here. That's because not only you're at the risk of coming in contact with the saw, but also heavy logs can crush your feet. That's why in order to keep the feet as good as new, you better cover them up with some safety or steel-toe boots.

Boots

But what will you do if you're not getting those boots due to a tight budget? Then try going for boots which are delivering similar safety levels as the steel-toes under the support of composite materials that can hold up like steel. But whatever you're buying, make sure it's covering your ankle too.

Gloves

As you're going to do all the things with your own hand, you need to put some protection on them as well. Yes, we meant using gloves. But like all the other gears, these gloves also have to be specialized enough to handle such a tough job as woodcutting.

Gloves

There are different kinds of work gloves, which include Kevlar lines and leather gloves. But we think the best one will be the one that has anti-vibration features. After all, the machine you'll be dealing with generates a humongous amount of vibration. And also, make sure that it fits you perfectly.

Head Protection

When you've climbed up on a tree and are trying to cut off some part of it, there's always a chance of falling if it's a fragile tree. So, you better be ready for anything, and that's why you need to get your head covered with a helmet.

Head Protection

Falling down from up there without one of those can lead you to major injury and sometimes cause death as well. It's better to go for headgears in a package where you can ear and eye protection too. After all, that's wiser than buying all of them separately.

Communication Device

At the time of climbing higher, you never know what kind of problem is waiting for you up there. That's why you need to keep something with yourself that can help you reach someone out there if you get stuck or in danger. The best way to communicate from there is using a cellphone or walky-talky.

First Aid Kit

It might get tough as hell to get down from a tree when you're injured. So, keep the first aid kit with you every time you go to cut off some trees. Do the same when you're working with wet logs as well. If you've got injured, the sooner you get yourself first aid, the easier it'll get for you to deal with the upcoming treatments.

First Aid Kit

Final Words

You're done with the whole article, right? Well, then let us ask you — is cutting wet wood bad for chainsaw? We bet you can answer that now with closed eyes. We don't know when the next time you'll go for some wet wood chopping; just make sure you're keeping yourself safe and following what we've told you.

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